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Unsplash Blog - Medium

On average 2 Articles by month

Behind the scenes building the open photography movement at Unsplash. - Medium

1 million images (and 10 more).

via Unsplash Blog - Medium
1 million images (and 10 more). Today, over 1 million images have been contributed on Unsplash.50,660 images have been contributed in the last month alone.We feel grateful to be building for the most passionate and creative community we’ve ever been a part of.If it wasn’t for you, hundreds of millions of creations would not exist.Problems in the world are solved by creativity. By making quality images accessible, more people can create. When more people create, more progress is made.So thank you for contributing. Thank you for being part of our community.Some of you might remember the first ten photos contributed on Unsplash. We thought it was fitting to kickoff the next million images with 10 more.million.unsplash.com❤️,Mikael and the Unsplash team1 million images (and 10 more). was originally published in Unsplash Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
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Unsplash + Dribbble

via Unsplash Blog - Medium
Unsplash + Dribbble Dribbble just launched a new ‘Made With’ filter so you can easily find Dribbble shots using Unsplash images.Our history with Dribbble goes wayyy back. First, from our Crew days (you can read all about that here). Then, a few years later — when Unsplash partnered with Dribbble to curate a special collection of photos inspired by your best basketball-themed photos, called Hoop Dreams (take a look at that collection over here).Images by Philipp Balunovic and Ryan Long.Dribbble is a go-to destination to find and showcase creative work, so the overlap between our two communities has been pretty clear from the start. Since we launched Unsplash it’s always been great to see everything from website redesigns, mockups and digital remixes over on Dribbble that incorporate Unsplash photos in some way. Unsplash exists to move creativity forward — which is why our new partnership with Dribbble is so exciting.Best Served Bold’s shot using Joshua Fuller’s image on Unsplash.Marcus Handa’s shot using Nathan Dumlao’s image on Unsplash🆕 Made With UnsplashToday, Dribbble has launched new shot categories and filters to make it easier to browse and search for design inspiration. They now have a new “Made With Unsplash” filter, which as the name suggests, lets you see all the Dribbble shots that were created using Unsplash images. With all the work now in one place — it’s been both humbling and inspiring to scroll through so many creative shots made with Unsplash images. The already beautiful images from Unsplash contributors are now getting the chance to take on a new form over on Dribbble.How to browse using the Made With Filter?Simple. Select Unsplash, under Dribbble’s new “Made With” filter on the Shots page, and you’ll instantly find all the work that have incorporated Unsplash images in some way.How to add your shots to the Made With Unsplash filter?Easy. To add shots to the filter, simply use the tag unsplash when uploading your work to Dribbble. Once you do that, your shots will join the the Made With Unsplash page, alongside all the other inspiring designs that use Unsplash images.Unsplash + Dribbble was originally published in Unsplash Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
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Self Made Series with Square

via Unsplash Blog - Medium
Self Made Series with Square Contributor Lawrson Pinson spoke about his experience on Unsplash at Square’s latest event.At Unsplash, we’ve been fans of Square for a while now. Their tools empower millions of small business owners from around the world to start, run and grow successful businesses. By providing easy-to-use technology for businesses of all sizes, Square ensures that no one is left behind because tools are too complex or expensive. They’re making sure there’s an even playing field for everyone to contribute to the economy — which we’re all about.Square recently started running their Self Made Series, to help support small businesses by showcasing Square Online in action and providing a space to share experiences with entrepreneurs in their area. When they asked us if we’d be interested in participating in their series, we thought it would be a great opportunity to speak about the impact that photography can have on transforming your online business.The event was in Atlanta, so we jumped at the chance to involve our community in some way. Immediately, Lawrson Pinson came to mind — who’s an amazing Fashion and Editorial Photographer (go take a look at his Unsplash profile to see for yourself), and an experienced creative entrepreneur in Atlanta.At the event, Lawrson spoke about his personal experience as a photographer, and how he used platforms like Unsplash to grow his business. He was also hired to take headshots of event attendees, so that they can use the images for their online businesses in the future.Lawrson on the event:Attending the Square Self Made event in Atlanta on behalf of Unsplash was an incredible experience. With the event attracting a massive crowd of entrepreneurs, I was honoured to represent Unsplash with a headshot station and showcase how important visuals are to branding your business. Being able to speak about my photography journey and how Unsplash has impacted me was game changing. After my speech I was able to continue working the headshot station as waves of people from the crowd felt inspired to represent their business with visuals. Working with Unsplash has given me a way to further expand the reach of my work and this event reminded me that I am on the right path.It was great to hear how the event attendees and our friends at Square really resonated with Lawrson’s talk. Dana, Square’s Brand Marketing Manager said, “Lawrson was a fabulous speaker and photographer who amazed us with his stage presence and speaking skills.”At Unsplash, we feel like this is just the start! We’re excited to keep working with contributors to showcase their experiences on the platform and how they use Unsplash to push the impact of their photography.If you’d ever like to get involved in an event like this, join our community slack channel to stay in the loop of upcoming opportunities.Self Made Series with Square was originally published in Unsplash Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
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What the Figma?

via Unsplash Blog - Medium
What the Figma? Thoughts on design software and why we migrated the Unsplash Design Library to Figma.There was a time when life was simple: I was a college student with an “extended trial” version of Photoshop and Illustrator—all you needed to get started in web/graphic design. Throw in Notepad++ if you dabbled in code.How things have changed. Until recently, we’ve juggled multiple subscriptions to handle our team’s product design and development stack: Creative Cloud, Sketch, Abstract, Marvel (at some point we also had InVision and Redpen), Dropbox, Trello, GitHub and Slack just to name a few. All amazing companies/services that make our work life, to an extent, a little easier.As a result, having an abundance of services lead us to an overcomplicated design workflow: jumping from Trello to Dropbox Paper to Sketch files scattered throughout Dropbox.Have you tried Sketch?Before we dive into why we switched to Figma, let’s take a step back and look at why we switched to Sketch in the first place.“I’m onto Affinity now” — Andrew AustinCharles Deluvio and I were those guys: solely designing in Adobe Illustrator—while the majority of designers were using Adobe Photoshop for web and interface design. When Sketch picked up hype, most of the shiny features that wow’ed Photoshop kids have been a long time part of Illustrator: art boards, vector-based, SVG support, grids, small file size, symbols, etc. We gave Sketch a shot but never had a good enough reason to jump ship to an unstable software that might not even exist tomorrow.Fast-forward to a year later and most designers have shifted to Sketch, while we were still rocking Illustrator. Then came along Sketch 3—with introduction to symbols, major improvements to speed, templating, SVG support, better style handling and more. We had also happened to hire a new teammate who was a Sketch user. This made us re-visit Sketch, fall in love with its speed, simple UI and focus on interface design—ultimately pushing us to work in Sketch and transitioning over.We gave up on Sketch a few times before transitioning over.Sketch set the new standard for interface design tools. Sketch is king 👑New kids in townSketch was king. Today, we have choices. Competitive choices between some industry heavy-lifters: Adobe XD, Figma, Framer, InVision Studio, Sketch, UXPin—and probably more that I’m not even aware of. Each company is trying to sway us into using their product by providing solutions to some of our “problems” or by simply offering a better alternative. These solutions are driven by marketing, fancy presentations and hype. Mainly hype.After trying out numerous αlphas and βetas, the line between apps quickly blurred: sleek UIs, libraries, component-based, responsive layout support, prototyping baked in, etc. Each tool is piggybacking on each other’s weaknesses.So how do you choose?For a long time we didn’t. We’ve put these αlphas aside and went back to using whichever tool we were most comfortable with and was getting the job done—for us it was Sketch.Why we switched to FigmaFundamentally, file naming conventions, file management and versioning at scale became cumbersome over time. We had a system in place to handle it all, yet it kept failing. As a result, we’ve ended up with numerous Sketch files scattered throughout our Dropbox.There are even numerous tools and plugins to help you organize and keep your Sketch files clean. Welcome to Plugin Hell 🔥[project_name]-[version]-[initials]-[send_help]We’ve tried Abstract, and while the idea behind it is great, it always felt like a patch than a permanent solution to our problem.And we’ve all been there: the dreaded Sketch Update Day.A new version of Sketch is available!It’s 10 AM and you’re scrolling through comments on Designer News to see if it’s safe to update. Little did you know, your teammate has already updated and the newly generated files aren’t backward compatible.“Is it safe to update Sketch? “Typical conversation on Sketch Update Day.If this wasn’t enough, let’s not forget about the process of managing Sketch licenses, onboarding and sharing Sketch libraries with new teammates.*shudders*It’s not you, it’s meAs a first solution, we decided to go over our file naming and handling process—but since Figma’s name kept popping up in our conversations, we could no longer disregard it. The more we looked into it, the more it made sense.The idea behind Figma was a breath of fresh air from the rest of the herd.No more files. No more syncing. No more Dropbox.And most importantly: it’s all about inclusive, transparent collaboration in the cloud. Charles and I have worked on Keynote iCloud decks in the past, so the idea of a collaborative workflow wasn’t new. The advantage of working in the same document simultaneously is hard to beat—which is Figma’s foundation.To add to that, the simplicity of copying a link and passing it to any stakeholder was a game changer. Not to mention Figma’s multi-platform compatibility: Linux? No problem.Jumping shipI won’t go into details about how we migrated to Figma, but rather outline the steps that we took that helped us switch confidently:Outlined the issues with our current workflowRead up on Figma and watched tutorials to get the feel of a possible workflowNoted down our findings, links to resources, tutorials and relevant articlesRan a test project on FigmaOutlined the pros and cons of switchingSplit up our components and migrated them one by one in the span of a few weeksDocument outlining the pros, cons and relevant articlesThere are consFigma isn’t perfect. Like any software, there are bugs and issues. We have an ongoing wishlist of features that we’d love to see. Dynamic buttons (rename and resize a button automatically) and dynamic placeholder images being the biggest hindrances for our team (Unsplash API could come in handy here 😉).One thing to keep in mind is that what works for one organization could be a disaster for another. Do your due diligence before jumping on the latest design tool fad. At Unsplash, Figma has been a tool that we’ve been discussing since its early days and have only migrated 3 years into its development—primarily because of our internal needs.What’s next?Moving forward, we’ll be migrating our remaining assets to Figma: mobile library, iOS library and various marketing graphics.We’ll also keep an eye open on the progress of competitor tools. Perhaps we’ll switch to something like Modulz and do this all over again.body[data-twttr-rendered="true"] {background-color: transparent;}.twitter-tweet {margin: auto !important;}TFW you switch to @figmadesign https://t.co/6Tm26S3sks — @kirillzfunction notifyResize(height) {height = height ? height : document.documentElement.offsetHeight; var resized = false; if (window.donkey && donkey.resize) {donkey.resize(height); resized = true;}if (parent && parent._resizeIframe) {var obj = {iframe: window.frameElement, height: height}; parent._resizeIframe(obj); resized = true;}if (window.location && window.location.hash === "#amp=1" && window.parent && window.parent.postMessage) {window.parent.postMessage({sentinel: "amp", type: "embed-size", height: height}, "*");}if (window.webkit && window.webkit.messageHandlers && window.webkit.messageHandlers.resize) {window.webkit.messageHandlers.resize.postMessage(height); resized = true;}return resized;}twttr.events.bind('rendered', function (event) {notifyResize();}); twttr.events.bind('resize', function (event) {notifyResize();});if (parent && parent._resizeIframe) {var maxWidth = parseInt(window.frameElement.getAttribute("width")); if ( 500 < maxWidth) {window.frameElement.setAttribute("width", "500");}}If you’re thinking of switching to Figma (or another design tool), I’d love to hear about your process. Leave your comments below or send me a tweet.What the Figma? was originally published in Unsplash Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
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HyperLogLog in Google BigQuery

via Unsplash Blog - Medium
HyperLogLog in Google BigQuery Counting and reporting uniques is always a challenge as it usually requires a full scan of the dataset to count the number of distinct values we have. On small datasets it’s fine but when dealing with larger volumes, it quickly becomes a performance and resource issue. We recently ran into that problem when trying to measure the number of unique users reached by Unsplash images.Photo by Joanna Kosinska on UnsplashUniques can’t be aggregatedThe uniqueness of a value also depends on the time range used and ranged counts can’t be aggregated. If you have 2M distinct identifiers per day for a week, it doesn’t mean that you have 14M distinct identifiers for that week. Some of these identifiers will appear in different days, making the true weekly count lower than the sum of the daily counts.In a time partitioned table, the full scan is a problem because whenever you need the unique count over a different time range, you need to scan the entire time range.Example for a daily partition:1 day = 1 table = 1 scan to count uniques1 week = 7 tables = 7 scans1 month = 31 tables = 31 scansetc…Table scans are both slow and expensive, so we want to avoid them as often as possible.What is HyperLogLog (HLL)?I won’t describe the algorithm itself, you can probably find a better explanation over here. What’s important for us is that it allows to calculate a precise estimate of the number of uniques values in a set of values. It still requires a full table scan because you need to input all the values for the algorithm to work, of course. Note that you don’t have to fit the data in memory and you can stream it through HyperLogLog, only keeping the uniques count (and HLL structure) at all times.Google’s implementation of HLL in BigQueryIn BigQuery’s standard SQL, HLL is available to speed up distinct counts if you’re willing to trade off a little bit of accuracy.Another benefit of using HLL in BigQuery is that it allows you to make a single scan of you daily table, even if you need both daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly and yearly uniques. It solves the uniques aggregation issue and helps saving a crazy amount of volume processing.This works because Google’s implementation allows you to save and load HyperLogLog schemas. HLL schemas are intermediary results that you can query, save and load. You can count uniques, save the HLL schema, load it the next day and start counting uniques for the next day, still considering the unique values that HLL processed the previous day. If a value is present in both days, it will be counted only once and not twice like a simple aggregation would do. You can also merge multiple daily schemas and the behaviour would be the same.The math is pretty simple. If you need a daily, monthly and yearly unique count, you’d have to make 3 full scans and pay:cost = 3 * daily volume * 365 * price per volumecost = 1095 * daily volume * price per volumeBut with the usage of HLL presented here, with a single table scan it would only cost you:cost = daily volume * 365 * price per volumecost = 365 * daily volume * price per volumeSince the price of merging HLL sketches is negligible, you’re saving 67% on your queries processing costs.Practical example of how we use BigQuery’s HLL at UnsplashComing back to our original problem: we’re trying to estimate how many people and devices Unsplash photos reach so we can report it to our contributors. We collect the logs of all our photo views tied to an anonymous device identifier. Counting how many distinct identifiers we have in our logs helps us understand how many devices we reach.Photo views logs are stored in daily partitioned tables in BigQuery. Each day, we count the number of distinct device identifiers with a true count and we estimate it with HLL. For that day, we store:The true distinct countThe HLL estimateThe HLL schema (that we can encode in Base64 for example)#standardSQLSELECT exact_count, HLL_COUNT.EXTRACT(hll_sketch) as hll_estimate, hll_sketchFROM ( SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT identifier) exact_count, HLL_COUNT.INIT(identifier) hll_sketch FROM `daily-logs-20190101`)The true distinct count allows us to draw the daily evolution of our reach. The HLL estimate tells us how precise the estimate is by comparing it to the true count. We can estimate precision with something like:precision = 1 - (|exact_count - hll_estimate| / exact_count)To chart the monthly evolution, we leverage the daily HLL schemas we stored. At the end of the month, we merge the 31 schemas and get the monthly estimate. We store the estimate and the new schema resulting of the merging.#standardSQLSELECT HLL_COUNT.EXTRACT(monthly_hll_sketch) monthly_estimateFROM ( SELECT HLL_COUNT.MERGE_PARTIAL(hll_sketch) monthly_hll_sketch FROM `daily-hll-sketches-january`)At the end of the quarter, we merge the 3 monthly schemas. At the end of the year, we merge the 12 monthly schemas … or the 4 quarterly ones.The impact on processing is huge. A single daily table scan is enough to count (estimate) uniques over any time period. The rest of the processing is simply merging HLL schemas which is very cheap.HyperLogLog in Google BigQuery was originally published in Unsplash Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
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So what’s a Census anyway?

via Unsplash Blog - Medium
So what\u2019s a Census anyway? We’ve just released the 2019 Unsplash Census. Let’s take a look at why it matters.So you might have seen our callouts to fill out the 2019 Census. Sounds super official, doesn’t it? It’s really just a fancy survey. Let’s take a look at why it’s useful and why we’d love you to take some time to answer it.We’re growingIn the last year alone, the Unsplash community has tripled in size. We have over 130,000 contributors and 70 million downloaders from every city around the world. And our growth spurt doesn’t seem to be slowing down any time soon.We want to get to know you a little betterBut as we grow, we want to make sure that we continue to learn about our community and understand what’s important to you all. Because the more we know about you, the more we can improve Unsplash in ways that work for you. That’s why we ask questions ranging from your interests to what types of images you download or contribute. We’re trying to get the full picture of how you interact with Unsplash.We want to make Unsplash the best it can beIt’s probably obvious that our team is always busy trying to improve how Unsplash works. But hearing what you have to say helps us narrow down what we should work on next. From what you love about the platform to what features you use the most — it all helps us make Unsplash better and better.Right this way to fill out our surveyWant to join in and answer some questions for us? Great! Head over to Unsplash and click the banner that says 2019 Unsplash Census. You’ll find it right before the editorial feed.https://unsplash.comSo what’s a Census anyway? was originally published in Unsplash Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
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Film photography in the spotlight on Unsplash

via Unsplash Blog - Medium and Unsplash Blog - Medium
Film photography in the spotlight on Unsplash Celebrating beautiful analog photography from the past and present day“The reason I shoot film in the age of the DSLR, the CMOS sensor, 16-bit RAW, four-hundred-and-nine-thousand ISO, and 61 points of phase-detection autofocus is simple: it is analogous to choosing your feet as a mode of transportation rather than the automobile, to spending an evening preparing a meal for your family instead of going out to a restaurant, or designing and building something yourself when you could have just purchased it. It is about the process. ” — Cody SmithPhotos by Diana SpatariuI was born in the mid 1970’s and like many born in that generation, my relationship with photography and film started the day I was born.That’s a pretty powerful thought isn’t it? There aren’t many things that you’re exposed to on the day you are born that remain with you for life.Growing up I was fascinated by looking at our family photo albums, seeing myself as a baby, how my parents and grandparents looked when they were younger. Those snapshots to the past, especially those of my parents and grandparents, helped me to develop a strong sense of identity and relate to others in my family.I can still vividly recall holding 35mm negative film up to the light and thinking how different everything looked, how it must be some magic that made the negatives from the camera, and then turn that tiny strip into bigger photographs. Decades later, I still look at negatives in the same way, with a sense of awe.Me rocking my ‘baby face’ — DownloadFilm photography has always been a part of Unsplash, but recently we’ve seen a rise in the the number of photographers sharing their film photography.body[data-twttr-rendered="true"] {background-color: transparent;}.twitter-tweet {margin: auto !important;}Got a new 35mm shot on editorial with @unsplash 🤟 https://t.co/pNYuzMzfIi — @imPatrickTfunction notifyResize(height) {height = height ? height : document.documentElement.offsetHeight; var resized = false; if (window.donkey && donkey.resize) {donkey.resize(height); resized = true;}if (parent && parent._resizeIframe) {var obj = {iframe: window.frameElement, height: height}; parent._resizeIframe(obj); resized = true;}if (window.location && window.location.hash === "#amp=1" && window.parent && window.parent.postMessage) {window.parent.postMessage({sentinel: "amp", type: "embed-size", height: height}, "*");}if (window.webkit && window.webkit.messageHandlers && window.webkit.messageHandlers.resize) {window.webkit.messageHandlers.resize.postMessage(height); resized = true;}return resized;}twttr.events.bind('rendered', function (event) {notifyResize();}); twttr.events.bind('resize', function (event) {notifyResize();});if (parent && parent._resizeIframe) {var maxWidth = parseInt(window.frameElement.getAttribute("width")); if ( 500 < maxWidth) {window.frameElement.setAttribute("width", "500");}}body[data-twttr-rendered="true"] {background-color: transparent;}.twitter-tweet {margin: auto !important;}Dropping some medium format scans on @Unsplash cc @AnnieSpratt — @jpvaleryfunction notifyResize(height) {height = height ? height : document.documentElement.offsetHeight; var resized = false; if (window.donkey && donkey.resize) {donkey.resize(height); resized = true;}if (parent && parent._resizeIframe) {var obj = {iframe: window.frameElement, height: height}; parent._resizeIframe(obj); resized = true;}if (window.location && window.location.hash === "#amp=1" && window.parent && window.parent.postMessage) {window.parent.postMessage({sentinel: "amp", type: "embed-size", height: height}, "*");}if (window.webkit && window.webkit.messageHandlers && window.webkit.messageHandlers.resize) {window.webkit.messageHandlers.resize.postMessage(height); resized = true;}return resized;}twttr.events.bind('rendered', function (event) {notifyResize();}); twttr.events.bind('resize', function (event) {notifyResize();});if (parent && parent._resizeIframe) {var maxWidth = parseInt(window.frameElement.getAttribute("width")); if ( 500 < maxWidth) {window.frameElement.setAttribute("width", "500");}}Surges in people discovering, or rediscovering, film is nothing new. Over the past few years I’ve heard ‘film is having a comeback’ numerous times. But truth be told it never really went anywhere, it’s just that some of us took longer to find it than others. Take me for example, I’m 44 years old and have just starting shooting film for the first time.Once I started shooting film, I started noticing film photography more as I navigated Unsplash in my day to day work and for personal inspiration. There’s been a trend over the past couple of years to create digital images that look like film, and whilst some come close to emulating real film you can usually tell the difference if you look closely enough. Often it’s the glorious imperfections that give the game away!One afternoon we set up a ‘Shot of film’ Unsplash profile, the share collections curated by the Unsplash Editoral Team, to showcase some of the brilliant film photography shared on Unsplash. It was shared with the rest of the team, and Luke Chesser jumped in with an idea…A few days later and the Film Topic was introduced on Unsplash, accessible directly from the homepage.body[data-twttr-rendered="true"] {background-color: transparent;}.twitter-tweet {margin: auto !important;}Thrilled to say we've added a new Film photography Topic on @unsplash 😍 https://t.co/Cgpl89Q7V9 — @AnnieSprattfunction notifyResize(height) {height = height ? height : document.documentElement.offsetHeight; var resized = false; if (window.donkey && donkey.resize) {donkey.resize(height); resized = true;}if (parent && parent._resizeIframe) {var obj = {iframe: window.frameElement, height: height}; parent._resizeIframe(obj); resized = true;}if (window.location && window.location.hash === "#amp=1" && window.parent && window.parent.postMessage) {window.parent.postMessage({sentinel: "amp", type: "embed-size", height: height}, "*");}if (window.webkit && window.webkit.messageHandlers && window.webkit.messageHandlers.resize) {window.webkit.messageHandlers.resize.postMessage(height); resized = true;}return resized;}twttr.events.bind('rendered', function (event) {notifyResize();}); twttr.events.bind('resize', function (event) {notifyResize();});if (parent && parent._resizeIframe) {var maxWidth = parseInt(window.frameElement.getAttribute("width")); if ( 500 < maxWidth) {window.frameElement.setAttribute("width", "500");}}If you share film photography on Unsplash, tag your images to help us discover them. Some good tags include; shot on film, 35mm, 120mm, film photography, analog.Of course you can also drop us a Tweet to let us know too.https://medium.com/media/0fef16b31e300a1df6bad81cf9c833c7/hrefInstant film, 35mm, 120mm, large format — it’s all welcome on Unsplash, so fire up your scanners or grab your DSLR and let’s bring these analogue moments into the digital world. Let’s share the beauty of film, introduce it to new audiences and support others starting to use film. 🎞Handy resourcesWhy YOU should be shooting film videoHow to Get Started With Film Photography articleHow to: Read light using basic daylight exposure (sunny 16 rule) videoHow to Scan and Organize 35mm Film Negatives videoScanning without a Scanner: Digitizing Your Film with a DSLR article🎞 Film photography in the spotlight on Unsplash was originally published in Unsplash Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
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Film photography in the spotlight on Unsplash

via Unsplash Blog - Medium and Unsplash Blog - Medium
Film photography in the spotlight on Unsplash Celebrating beautiful analog photography from the past and present day“The reason I shoot film in the age of the DSLR, the CMOS sensor, 16-bit RAW, four-hundred-and-nine-thousand ISO, and 61 points of phase-detection autofocus is simple: it is analogous to choosing your feet as a mode of transportation rather than the automobile, to spending an evening preparing a meal for your family instead of going out to a restaurant, or designing and building something yourself when you could have just purchased it. It is about the process. ” — Cody SmithPhotos by Diana SpatariuI was born in the mid 1970’s and like many born in that generation, my relationship with photography and film started the day I was born.That’s a pretty powerful thought isn’t it? There aren’t many things that you’re exposed to on the day you are born that remain with you for life.Growing up I was fascinated by looking at our family photo albums, seeing myself as a baby, how my parents and grandparents looked when they were younger. Those snapshots to the past, especially those of my parents and grandparents, helped me to develop a strong sense of identity and relate to others in my family.I can still vividly recall holding 35mm negative film up to the light and thinking how different everything looked, how it must be some magic that made the negatives from the camera, and then turn that tiny strip into bigger photographs. Decades later, I still look at negatives in the same way, with a sense of awe.Me rocking my ‘baby face’ — DownloadFilm photography has always been a part of Unsplash, but recently we’ve seen a rise in the the number of photographers sharing their film photography.body[data-twttr-rendered="true"] {background-color: transparent;}.twitter-tweet {margin: auto !important;}Got a new 35mm shot on editorial with @unsplash 🤟 https://t.co/pNYuzMzfIi — @imPatrickTfunction notifyResize(height) {height = height ? height : document.documentElement.offsetHeight; var resized = false; if (window.donkey && donkey.resize) {donkey.resize(height); resized = true;}if (parent && parent._resizeIframe) {var obj = {iframe: window.frameElement, height: height}; parent._resizeIframe(obj); resized = true;}if (window.location && window.location.hash === "#amp=1" && window.parent && window.parent.postMessage) {window.parent.postMessage({sentinel: "amp", type: "embed-size", height: height}, "*");}if (window.webkit && window.webkit.messageHandlers && window.webkit.messageHandlers.resize) {window.webkit.messageHandlers.resize.postMessage(height); resized = true;}return resized;}twttr.events.bind('rendered', function (event) {notifyResize();}); twttr.events.bind('resize', function (event) {notifyResize();});if (parent && parent._resizeIframe) {var maxWidth = parseInt(window.frameElement.getAttribute("width")); if ( 500 < maxWidth) {window.frameElement.setAttribute("width", "500");}}body[data-twttr-rendered="true"] {background-color: transparent;}.twitter-tweet {margin: auto !important;}Dropping some medium format scans on @Unsplash cc @AnnieSpratt — @jpvaleryfunction notifyResize(height) {height = height ? height : document.documentElement.offsetHeight; var resized = false; if (window.donkey && donkey.resize) {donkey.resize(height); resized = true;}if (parent && parent._resizeIframe) {var obj = {iframe: window.frameElement, height: height}; parent._resizeIframe(obj); resized = true;}if (window.location && window.location.hash === "#amp=1" && window.parent && window.parent.postMessage) {window.parent.postMessage({sentinel: "amp", type: "embed-size", height: height}, "*");}if (window.webkit && window.webkit.messageHandlers && window.webkit.messageHandlers.resize) {window.webkit.messageHandlers.resize.postMessage(height); resized = true;}return resized;}twttr.events.bind('rendered', function (event) {notifyResize();}); twttr.events.bind('resize', function (event) {notifyResize();});if (parent && parent._resizeIframe) {var maxWidth = parseInt(window.frameElement.getAttribute("width")); if ( 500 < maxWidth) {window.frameElement.setAttribute("width", "500");}}Surges in people discovering, or rediscovering, film is nothing new. Over the past few years I’ve heard ‘film is having a comeback’ numerous times. But truth be told it never really went anywhere, it’s just that some of us took longer to find it than others. Take me for example, I’m 44 years old and have just starting shooting film for the first time.Once I started shooting film, I started noticing film photography more as I navigated Unsplash in my day to day work and for personal inspiration. There’s been a trend over the past couple of years to create digital images that look like film, and whilst some come close to emulating real film you can usually tell the difference if you look closely enough. Often it’s the glorious imperfections that give the game away!One afternoon we set up a ‘Shot of film’ Unsplash profile, the share collections curated by the Unsplash Editoral Team, to showcase some of the brilliant film photography shared on Unsplash. It was shared with the rest of the team, and Luke Chesser jumped in with an idea…A few days later and the Film Topic was introduced on Unsplash, accessible directly from the homepage.body[data-twttr-rendered="true"] {background-color: transparent;}.twitter-tweet {margin: auto !important;}Thrilled to say we've added a new Film photography Topic on @unsplash 😍 https://t.co/Cgpl89Q7V9 — @AnnieSprattfunction notifyResize(height) {height = height ? height : document.documentElement.offsetHeight; var resized = false; if (window.donkey && donkey.resize) {donkey.resize(height); resized = true;}if (parent && parent._resizeIframe) {var obj = {iframe: window.frameElement, height: height}; parent._resizeIframe(obj); resized = true;}if (window.location && window.location.hash === "#amp=1" && window.parent && window.parent.postMessage) {window.parent.postMessage({sentinel: "amp", type: "embed-size", height: height}, "*");}if (window.webkit && window.webkit.messageHandlers && window.webkit.messageHandlers.resize) {window.webkit.messageHandlers.resize.postMessage(height); resized = true;}return resized;}twttr.events.bind('rendered', function (event) {notifyResize();}); twttr.events.bind('resize', function (event) {notifyResize();});if (parent && parent._resizeIframe) {var maxWidth = parseInt(window.frameElement.getAttribute("width")); if ( 500 < maxWidth) {window.frameElement.setAttribute("width", "500");}}If you share film photography on Unsplash, tag your images to help us discover them. Some good tags include; shot on film, 35mm, 120mm, film photography, analog.Of course you can also drop us a Tweet to let us know too.https://medium.com/media/0fef16b31e300a1df6bad81cf9c833c7/hrefInstant film, 35mm, 120mm, large format — it’s all welcome on Unsplash, so fire up your scanners or grab your DSLR and let’s bring these analogue moments into the digital world. Let’s share the beauty of film, introduce it to new audiences and support others starting to use film. 🎞Handy resourcesWhy YOU should be shooting film videoHow to Get Started With Film Photography articleHow to: Read light using basic daylight exposure (sunny 16 rule) videoHow to Scan and Organize 35mm Film Negatives videoScanning without a Scanner: Digitizing Your Film with a DSLR article🎞 Film photography in the spotlight on Unsplash was originally published in Unsplash Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
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Unsplash + Notion

via Unsplash Blog - Medium
Unsplash + Notion Get organized with this all-in-one workspace, so you can focus on the fun stuff.Picture an average morning in the office: Check your Slack notifications. Move on to your emails. Open up the 7 Google Docs you’re working on. Search your desk for that piece of scrap paper with all of your meeting notes from the day before. Edit that daunting Excel Spreadsheet. Respond to more emails. Repeat.If that sounds familiar, (sadly) you’re not alone. The reality is that it’s pretty easy to lose your morning because you’re busy hunting down that perfect to-do-list you’d jotted down in your email drafts somewhere the day before. Or maybe you’re just stuck staring at the 20 tabs you have open in horror.Well, Notion is ready to change that.They’ve created an all-in-one workspace where you can find everything you need to focus on what actually matters most: creating. Instead of getting bogged down by all the tools floating around on your desktop, Notion is reimagining your workflows so that your notes, tasks, wikis and databases are easy to find (because hint: they’re all together).While the concept that everything you need is in one place may not sound revolutionary — take a look at how many tabs you have open right now and ask yourself if Notion is the simple solution to your lack of focus and productivity. Most likely, it is.Notion’s got a few other features that make it easy for you to get stuff done in whatever way works for you. It syncs across all of your devices so you can access your information in your office, on your phone, or wherever else you may need them. Plus, Notion lets you collaborate with teammates in real time, or continue working on something offline — without the worry of losing all of your work (because that’s definitely happened to most of us, and it’s never fun).Add Unsplash images to your Notion workspaceIt became clear to us pretty quickly that a partnership between Notion and Unsplash just made sense. Plus, you all seemed to agree. You took to Twitter in record numbers to let us know how much the integration would help you stay inspired as you worked.body[data-twttr-rendered="true"] {background-color: transparent;}.twitter-tweet {margin: auto !important;}💕 @unsplash + @NotionHQ needs to be a thing, would make for great cover art on documents. — @rsclarkefunction notifyResize(height) {height = height ? height : document.documentElement.offsetHeight; var resized = false; if (window.donkey && donkey.resize) {donkey.resize(height); resized = true;}if (parent && parent._resizeIframe) {var obj = {iframe: window.frameElement, height: height}; parent._resizeIframe(obj); resized = true;}if (window.location && window.location.hash === "#amp=1" && window.parent && window.parent.postMessage) {window.parent.postMessage({sentinel: "amp", type: "embed-size", height: height}, "*");}if (window.webkit && window.webkit.messageHandlers && window.webkit.messageHandlers.resize) {window.webkit.messageHandlers.resize.postMessage(height); resized = true;}return resized;}twttr.events.bind('rendered', function (event) {notifyResize();}); twttr.events.bind('resize', function (event) {notifyResize();});if (parent && parent._resizeIframe) {var maxWidth = parseInt(window.frameElement.getAttribute("width")); if ( 500 < maxWidth) {window.frameElement.setAttribute("width", "500");}}body[data-twttr-rendered="true"] {background-color: transparent;}.twitter-tweet {margin: auto !important;}Just started using @NotionHQ. Loving emojis. What would be amazing is if @NotionHQ used @unsplash for cover images 😎 — @grakozyfunction notifyResize(height) {height = height ? height : document.documentElement.offsetHeight; var resized = false; if (window.donkey && donkey.resize) {donkey.resize(height); resized = true;}if (parent && parent._resizeIframe) {var obj = {iframe: window.frameElement, height: height}; parent._resizeIframe(obj); resized = true;}if (window.location && window.location.hash === "#amp=1" && window.parent && window.parent.postMessage) {window.parent.postMessage({sentinel: "amp", type: "embed-size", height: height}, "*");}if (window.webkit && window.webkit.messageHandlers && window.webkit.messageHandlers.resize) {window.webkit.messageHandlers.resize.postMessage(height); resized = true;}return resized;}twttr.events.bind('rendered', function (event) {notifyResize();}); twttr.events.bind('resize', function (event) {notifyResize();});if (parent && parent._resizeIframe) {var maxWidth = parseInt(window.frameElement.getAttribute("width")); if ( 500 < maxWidth) {window.frameElement.setAttribute("width", "500");}}So without further ado, you can now access Unsplash’s library of over 950k beautiful, curated photos in Notion — for free. And as always, each photo links back to the photographer’s Unsplash profile so you can stay inspired by checking out the other photos they’ve created.Preview of the Unsplash integration within NotionWhether you’re hoping to add a little life to your next to-do list or needing a few images to accompany some writing you’ve got on-the-go -all you have to do is bring in a beautiful image from Unsplash.More on Unsplash Partnerships. This partnership with Notion is part of our continued mission to push the impact of photography as far as we can to enable everyone to create.1079 partners including Dropbox, Adobe, Google, Sketch, Square, Semplice, Typeform, Weebly, PicsArt, Ghost, CodePen, Unfold, Product Hunt, Anchor, InVision, Unbounce, Muzli, Squarespace, Trello, WeTransfer, and Medium support this mission by officially integrating with the Unsplash API.🔥Unsplash + Notion was originally published in Unsplash Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
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Dear mobile app developers, we have something for you.

via Unsplash Blog - Medium
Dear mobile app developers, we have something for you. We’ve always believed that the best tools we can offer to mobile developers are user interfaces to access the Unsplash library that can be added quickly in their apps.Five months ago we released the Unsplash Photo Picker for iOS, a UI component that allows applications to search and download photos from the Unsplash library easily.Photo Picker for iOSToday, we are releasing the Unsplash Photo Picker for Android. In less than 10 minutes, developers can integrate Unsplash in their apps to offer beautiful, high-quality photos to their users.Photo Picker for AndroidWe tried to make these components as easy as possible to integrate into mobile apps, so don’t hesitate to send us an email at apps@unsplash.com if you have any question or feedback.Visit our Developer page more information about our tools for developers.Dear mobile app developers, we have something for you. was originally published in Unsplash Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
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